#Write52

1: Pipirrana andaluza, or How to translate dish names

1: Pipirrana andaluza, or How to translate dish names

Last week, I posted about #ThatTranslatorCanCook, a year-long challenge marrying food and translation. The idea was dreamt up by my colleague Hannah Lawrence (see her blog post about the challenge here: #ThatTranslatorCanCook: how I set myself a crazy recipe translation and cooking challenge).

In last week’s post, I said I already had a recipe in mind for the August heat in Portland this week.

A year-long food adventure

Starting this week, I’ll be joining a lovely translator colleague, Hannah Lawrence, in a challenge to translate and cook 52 recipes in 52 weeks. I saw Hannah’s post on Twitter about the endeavor last week, and when I expressed interest, she was kind enough to let me tag along. You can see her blog post about the challenge here: #ThatTranslatorCanCook: how I set myself a crazy recipe translation and cooking challenge.

With life and work, I thought I may not be able to commit to a recipe a week for a year, but I do cook (and translate) most days, and I love a good challenge. Especially one that involves food. (As long as it’s not a hot dog eating contest.)

And as for what I’ll do when I’m on vacation, why not add a cocido madrileño (a hot stew from Madrid featuring garbanzo beans and meat) or a fabada (the quintissential Asturian stew, heavier on the beans than cocido) to the Thanksgiving menu, for example?

I already have my eye set on a refreshing summer recipe from Andalusia to cool down in the August heat in Portland this week. And no, it’s not gazpacho or salmorejo! (But I’ll get to those, too.) Wait a few days and you’ll see.

Follow along:

#ThatTranslatorCanCook

#Write52 (consider our challenge a culinary translator’s answer to copywriter Ed Callow’s goal of writing about a record in his vinyl collection each week for a year, which has sparked other writers to pick up their pens—or keyboards—every week)